Recommended Reads: Queer Fiction

Afternoon friends! I hope you’re all having a lovely weekend.

 

I’ve decided that after I review a book, I’ll post a list of recommended novels to try. Either by the same author or in the same genre. So off the back of my Mysterious Skin review, I’ve decided to recommend a list of Queer fiction.

 

Queer fiction is an interesting genre title. It is both uniting and exclusionary. By its separation in book shops it is kept away from “normal” fiction, and as a result is not explored or praised as much as it should be. Many novels that fall into the genre of Queer fiction are complex and powerful tales, and some certainly deserve more attention than they receive.

 

Anyway, I digress. Here is a list of five novels I have read, or am going to read, that are similar to Mysterious Skin. Enjoy!

GAW

The Great American Whatever – Tim Federle

 

This is award-winning author Tim Federle’s first venture into YA literature. The story focuses on Quinn, a gay teen, struggling to come to terms with his sister’s death. It follows the traditional queer Bildungsroman narrative, but in a fun and flirty way while never letting Quinn’s sexuality be the primary focus. This is a book I am very interested in, and it’s certainly placed high on my to-read list.

ColorPurple

The Color Purple – Alice Walker

 

Walker won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction for this novel, and it was later adapted into a film and musical. The story focuses on a group of African-American women in 1930s south USA, and addressed themes of race, class and sexuality. The book has been widely censored since its release, due to its explicit content and scenes of violence. If you haven’t read this book before, do.

OrangesAreNotTheOnlyFruit

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit – Jeanette Winterson

 

This novel is a coming-of-age story focusing on a young girl called Jeanette, who attempts to understand her sexuality in a heavily religious family environment. The book is semi-autobiographical in nature, based on events from Winterson’s early life. The story is at times saddening and chilling, and while I’m not the biggest fan of Winterson’s work, I have to appreciate the concise way in which she tells her tale.

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The City and the Pillar – Gore Vidal

 

This novel came out back in 1948 and is recognised as the first novel featuring a gay protagonist who was not killed off for their sexuality. For such a novel to be released at a time when homosexuality was still illegal is an incredible thought, and of course sparked massive public controversy. The story focuses on Jim Willard, a young man growing up in 1930s Virginia, coming to terms with his own sexuality. If there was ever a queer novel to read solely due to its historical importance, it’s this one.

gilded razor

The Gilded Razor – Sam Lansky

 

The Gilded Razor is a memoir of Lansky’s early adulthood, and addresses his descent from Ivy League hopeful into broken teen, by way of drug addiction. Lansky attempts to fill the void in his life with copious drugs and a string of affairs with older men, but manages to tell the story in a frank and sensitive way. Lansky manages to look into his own life and reveal common issues we all face. I would recommend this book to everyone, regardless of its applicability to your own life.

 

Well that’s my five recommended novels, I hope you like them. If you have any suggestions or thoughts, I’d be happy to hear. Thanks!

Mysterious Skin – Scott Heim. A review.

Mysterious Skin is certainly not a novel that is approached lightly.

 

Scott Heim’s coming-of-age story centres around two young boys who are connected through a life-changing event, and it explores the very different ways they are affected. Heim certainly doesn’t hold back in this novel, and chooses to explore some very dark themes in the protagonists’ journey to realise who they are.

 

The story begins with a young Brian Lackey being found bleeding in the crawl-space beneath his house, seeming to have lost five hours of his life. After years of strange dreams, he eventually he becomes convinced he is the victim of an alien abduction, and devotes his life to discovering the truth. The second protagonist, Neil McCormick, is fully aware of the events that led to this moment, and realises he is the only one who can help Brian deal with his missing time.

 

Neil is certainly the anti-hero of the novel. His life is centred around the events of his childhood, and the love he believes he has found in his baseball coach. Fast-forward ten years, and Neil, having come to terms with his sexuality, works as a teenage hustler with dreams of something more. He moves to New York with his soul-mate Wendy but eventually falls back into his old ways, landing himself in more trouble than ever. Some of the events that take place with the New York “johns” are genuinely some the most harrowing the book, and that’s saying something. Neil is a very complex character with an incredibly strong sense of agency, he knows exactly what he wants and is willing to manipulate anyone to get it. He also has a soft side however, taking his friend Eric and Brian under his wing to guide them through their own troubles. Neil is wise beyond his years, and loyal to a fault, and for me was the break-out character of the novel.

 

Brian however is a sweet kid. He deals with his experience by becoming introverted, and after his dad walks out on the family becomes rooted to his home town. His inability to move on from his supposed alien abduction forces him to become obsessed, eventually befriending another abductee; Avalyn Friesen. With her help Brian is able to uncover more details in his dreams, leading him to Neil. The closing scenes between the two characters are some of the most emotive I have ever read, and it is incredibly satisfying for Brian to finally find closure. Brian’s quiet obsession perfectly balances out Neil’s explosive voice, and their narratives are linked in complex and interesting ways. They are yin and yang, light and dark.

 

A special mention should be given to the supporting cast too; Wendy, Eric, the moms. It is with their help that Neil and Brian are brought together, and are able to move on from their traumatic childhood. Something from which they can all benefit.

 

I think this book can only really be summed up with my opening statement; do not approach it lightly. But I don’t say that as a warning, simply guidance. The novel deals with its themes in a mature and sensitive way, and is certainly thought-provoking literature. So if you haven’t read it, please do. And if you have read it, read it again.

Thanks for reading!

My Top 5 Books (or Series)

A small taste of my favourite books

Hello all!

Hope the weather is good where you are, it certainly is here.

I’ve decided to write a list of my favourite books. Granted, this list could probably be 10 times longer than it is, but I wanted to keep it short and sweet. The five books I’ve chosen are ones that I can read again and again, and have inspired me to become a writer. I’ll probably expand on this list at some point, but for now, enjoy!

Thegirlwiththedragontattoo

Millenium Trilogy – Stieg Larsson

Genre: Thriller

 

I’ve lost track of the amount of times I have read this series. Focusing on disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist and expert hacker Lisbeth Salander, Larsson seamlessly blends his own journalistic knowledge of Swedish crime with a truly dark imagination that few possess on such a level (looking at you, Mr King). The original Swedish title of Män som hatar kvinnor (Men Who Hate Women) is certainly more appropriate, as Larsson takes a very harrowing look at the issues surrounding female abuse. Larsson sadly passed away in 2004 before the series was published, and didn’t get to see its success.

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The Lord of the Rings – J.R.R. Tolkien

Genre: High Fantasy/ Mythopoeia

 

This series was a childhood favourite of mine. The depth of the world Tolkien has created is truly awe-inspiring, having written a vast collection of works throughout his lifetime set in the universe of Ea. Tolkien and I share a love of all things Old English, and its influence on his work is evident in almost every grain of detail. The term “Middle-Earth” actually comes from the Old English term middangeard, the Germanic name for the world of Men. For anyone that’s interested he also did a brilliant translation of Beowulf, edited and published by his son, Christopher Tolkein.

american psycho

American Psycho – Brett Easton Ellis

Genre: Psychological Thriller/Satire

 

Well, what can you say about this book? It’s dark. Really, really dark. And that Ellis is a genius. His satirical take on postmodern consumerism shows what happens when a man thinks everything is a commodity, including human life. Patrick Bateman is the stereotype of yuppie culture, and Ellis’ attention to detail around this is perfect. The narrative is funny, bleak, and at times downright chilling, but you still care for Patrick. It’s not his fault. Society made him this way. I genuinely don’t think I will ever get tired of coming back to this book, each time I read it I take away something new.

roald dahl

My Uncle Oswald – Roald Dahl

Genre: Speculative Fiction

 

My family’s copy of this book got read so many times both covers fell off, and eventually we lost some pages too. I don’t think it ever got replaced. Roald Dahl was a very versatile writer, being a bestseller in both adult and children’s fiction. This novel offers a few hours light reading, and focuses on Oswald Cornelius and his partner Yasmin Howcomely attempting to set up the world’s first sperm bank. The themes of the novel could be considered somewhat outdated, but if taken lightly can be amusing in a drunk-grandma-telling-dirty-jokes kind of way.

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The Shining – Stephen King

Genre: Psychological Thriller/Horror

 

I imagine this book appears on a lot of people’s lists, and it would hardly be a surprise. Everything about this novel works. Jack Torrance’s descent into madness is a harrowing tale, taking on a very Gothic tone at times. There is a certain nuance to the book that Stanley Kubrick failed to capture in the film, and this is definitely helped by King’s mastery of the word. King manages to get inside Jack’s head while still keeping the reader at a distance. After all, how can one care for a character hell-bent (literally) on murdering his family for a place at the table?

 

So there you have it. My top 5. I’ll review some of these books in more detail at a later date.

Thanks for stopping by!